Earn your next badge with some help from the New-York Historical Society!

Just launched this fall, we offer exclusive programs for Tiger Cubs, Wolf Cubs, Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts. These programs are are designed to help Troops fulfill requirements towards badges!

Scout Group Visit Policies and Procedures:

Private Scout Programs allow you to pick the day and program for your troop. All New-York Historical Society Museum-based Boy Scout Troop Programs satisfy requirements towards select badge fulfillment. Advance registration is required.

  • All programs are led by highly qualified New-York Historical Society Museum Educators and Teaching Artists and make use of the Museum’s objects, artwork, images, maps, and documents
  • Boy Scout Programs are 90 minutes long and may be reserved during Museum hours. Programs cannot be extended past 90 minutes. If a group arrives later than the appointed time, the program will be shorten to end at its original time.
  • Field Trips cost a flat rate of $150.00. Payment must be received to make a reservation. We accept credit cards, and checks.
  • Programs can have up to 30 scouts and must have one adult chaperone per every 10 participants.
  • Lunch facilities are not available in the Museum. Groups are encouraged to picnic in Central Park
  • Field trips can include New York Story, a dynamic 20-minute film covering 400 years of history. The film is recommended for second graders and above.
  • The completion of each program will entitle scouts to a New-York Historical Patch! Patches are available for purchase at the Museum Store. The cost per patch is $4.00.
  • Space is limited, so book today!

To book a program, please email us at group.tours@nyhistory.org or call (212) 873-3400 ext. 352

On Scout Days children will be able to participate in fun and informative activities led by museum educators. Advance registration for Scout Day is recommended.

 

Troop Boy Scout Programs | Boy Scout Independent Studies

 

Private Scout Programs

Scholarship

Scholarship Patch

2a) Make a list of educational places located where you live (other than schools).
Visit one, and report on how you used the place for self-education.
2b) Interview two professionals  (other than teachers or other professionals at your school) with established careers.  Find out where they were educated, what training they received, and how their education and training have helped prepare them for the career they have chosen. Find out how they continue to educate themselves.


While at the Museum...
Industrialization (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts will investigate how life in New York City was transformed by the innovations of the Industrial Age. Scouts will display self-education skills engaging in object and image inquiry and by employing a Museum Web Worksheet to record what they learn about the Industrial Revolution.

A Day at the Museum: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Tiger Cubs, Wolf Cubs, Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts will explore the galleries to learn the fundamentals of a museum visit and the different jobs people have in the museum community. By studying paintings and objects from long ago, Scouts will begin to understand the meaning of history and the purpose of a museum. During free exploration, Scouts will have the opportunity to select, examine, and sketch artifacts found by avocational archeologists and other professionals seeking history below the ground of New York City.

 

American Heritage

American Heritage Patch

2a) Select two individuals from American history, one a political leader (a president, senator, etc.) and the other a private citizen (a writer, religious leader, etc.). Find out about each person’s accomplishments and compare the contributions each has made to America’s heritage.
2b) Choose an organization that has promoted some type of positive change in American society. Find out why the organization believed this change was necessary and how it helped to accomplish the change. Discuss how this organization is related to events or situations from America’s past.

While at the Museum...
New York and the Civil War (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts learn about the experiences of soldiers and analyze the debates that raged in New York over slavery, states' rights, and the rights of citizens. Scouts will examine the abolitionist figures and antislavery movements established to end the practice of slavery.

The American Revolution in New York (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts consider and causes, effects, and significance of the American Revolution in New York and engage in a discussion of notable New York private citizens and political leaders, who contributed the revolutionary ideas that would ultimately launch the American Revolution.

Slavery in New York (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts uncover the essential roles enslaved people played in Dutch, British, and    American New York. Scouts will hear the story and accomplishments of Peter Williams, who was born a slave and who became a leader in the free black community of New York as a founding member of both the Zion Chapel and the NY African Society for Mutual Relief.

 

Art

Art Patch

1a) What art is and what some of the different forms of art are
1b) The importance of art to humankind
1c) What art means to you and how art can make you feel





While at the Museum...
Being a Historian: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts learn how to interpret the stories told in portraits, landscapes, and cityscapes. Scouts consider not only the subject and story of a painting but how and why it was created. By the end of the program, scouts will have learned how to “read” a painting just like a historian, and discover information about the past.

A Day at the Museum: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Tiger Cubs and Wolf Cubs)

  • Boy Scouts will explore the galleries to learn the fundamentals of a museum visit and the different jobs people have in the museum community. Scouts learn the techniques artists use to create different styles of paintings - landscapes, portraits, genre scenes – and explore an example of each.

Learning History with Paintings (Tiger Cubs, Wolf Cubs, Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts examine, describe, and imagine life in the past by looking at beautiful paintings; and learn how to interpret the stories these works of art tell.  - Added 9/16/15

 

Collections

Collections Patch

3a) Explain the precautions you need to take to preserve your collection, including: handling, cleaning, and storage
3b) Explain how best to display your collection, keeping in mind preserving as discussed above.
3c) Explain to your counselor the events available for a hobbyist of this collection, including shows, seminars, conventions, contests, and museum programs and exhibits."

While at the Museum...
Being a Historian: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts will be confronted with the challenges of finding ways to make historical objects, paintings and documents accessible to all and the people (curators, educators, conservationists, security guards, museum services staff, docents, etc.) who make displaying and preserving a collection possible.

A Day at the Museum: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society Museum (Tiger Cubs and Wolf Cubs)

  • Boy Scouts explore the galleries to learn the fundamentals of a museum visit and the different jobs people have in the museum community. Scouts will discuss the kind of work that goes on in a museum, including how different types of artifacts are cared for. Topics will also include the type of career opportunities available at a museum.

Objects Tell Stories (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • How do museums tell stories with objects? Boy Scouts analyze historical artifacts to discover what they tell us about life long ago.  Scouts will consider the specific features that work together to create an exhibition. One of our Museum Educators will lead an investigation that uncovers how a museum displays and organizes artifacts to allow visitors to learn about the past.

 

Archaeology

Archaeology Patch

10b) Research settlers or soldiers who were in your area at least 100 years ago. Find out about the houses or forts, ways of life, clothing styles, arts and crafts, and dietary habits of the early settlers, farmers, ranchers, soldiers, or townspeople who once lived in the area where your community now stands. Describe what you would expect to find at an archaeological site for these people.


While at the Museum...
The American Revolution in New York (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts consider and causes, effects, and significance of the American Revolution in New York. Touch objects and American Revolution War Artifacts will transform Scouts into Historians, who will use artifacts excavated from a fort site to learn what it was like to live day to day as a regular person who lived in the past.

Being a Historian: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts learn how to think and work like historians in order to draw conclusions about the past. Through close observation and careful inferences, Scouts will discover what historians learn by looking at artifacts of simple everyday objects.

New York: Then and Now (Tiger Cubs, Wolf Cubs, Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts explore the evolution of our city, comparing and contrasting daily life across the centuries. Using descriptive vocabulary, Scouts will learn how to interpret an artifact so that we may understand what life was like for early Manhattan settlers.

Objects Tell Stories (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts analyze historical artifacts to discover what they tell us about life long ago.  Through engagement with specific artifacts available in the New-York Historical Society’s Permanent Collection, Scouts will apprehend, for example, the dietary habits of the people of New York in the early 20th century as well exactly how people in New York had to fetch their water by hand from wells or fresh water streams that could be miles away.

Life in New Amsterdam (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts learn about the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam, from the reasons of its founding to the realities of daily life.  Scouts will take what investigative methods they demonstrate as Museum Historians and apply the knowledge to learning about their community.

 

Reading

Reading Patch

2) Read about the world around you from any two sources - books, magazines, newspapers, the Internet (with your parent's permission), field manuals, etc. Topics may include sports, environmental problems, politics, social issues, current events, nature, religion, etc. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor.




While at the Museum...
Slavery in New York (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts uncover the essential roles enslaved people played in Dutch, British, and American New York. Scouts review three kinds of sources used to study people in the past – documents, artifacts and art. 

Being a Historian: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts learn how to think and work like historians in order to draw conclusions about the past. The N-YHS Library is home to over a million manuscripts and documents, including maps, journals, letter, newspapers, books, etc. By participating in this program, Scouts will gain experience working with primary resources, recognizing just how important these materials are to historical study.

A Day at the Museum: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Tiger Cubs and Wolf Cubs)

  • Boy Scouts explore the galleries to learn the fundamentals of a museum visit and the different jobs people have in the museum community. Scouts will discuss the various functions of a library and the staff that make it up.

 

American Labor

American Labor Patch

1) Using resources available to you, learn about working people and work-related concerns. List and briefly describe or give examples of at least EIGHT concerns of American workers. These may include, but are not limited to, working conditions, workplace safety, hours, wages, seniority, job security, equal-opportunity employment and discrimination, guest workers, automation and technologies that replace workers, unemployment, layoffs, outsourcing, and employee benefits such as health care, child care, profit sharing, and retirement benefits.

While at the Museum...
Industrialization (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Boy Scouts how life in New York City was transformed by the innovations of the Industrial Age. Scouts will focus on some of the individual inventions that changed the lives of New Yorkers, sometimes at the expense of the working class.  Scouts will encounter the adverse consequences that resulted from Industrialization, including concerns of working conditions, workplace safety, hours, and wages.

 

Programming

Programming Patch

2) History. Do the Following:
2a) Give a brief history of programming, including at least three milestones related to the advancement or development of programming.
2b) Describe the evolution of programming methods and how they have improved over time.



While at the Museum...
Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York (Bear Cubs, Webelos, and Boy Scouts)

  • Guided Tour of Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York. Using images, artifacts, interactives, and oral histories, the exhibition will look back at local innovations that were key to computer development, from vacuum tubes and punched cards to transistors. And it will highlight pioneering work after the 1964 Fair, such as the computer graphics revolution born in New York City a decade later. Long before Silicon Valley became synonymous with all things digital, New York was a key hub for imagining, developing, and selling the technology that ultimately reshaped entertainment, commerce, and daily life.
  • Boy Scouts will then participate in an introductory coding workshop in an N-YHS computer lab.
Creative: Tronvig Group