Earn your next badge with some help from the New-York Historical Society!

Just launched this fall, we offer exclusive programs for Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors. These programs are are designed to help Troops fulfill requirements towards badges!

Scout Group Visit Policies and Procedures:

Private Scout Programs allow you to pick the day and program for your troop. All New-York Historical Society Museum-based Girl Scout Troop Programs satisfy requirements towards select badge fulfillment. Advance registration is required.

  • All programs are led by highly qualified New-York Historical Society Museum Educators and Teaching Artists and make use of the Museum’s objects, artwork, images, maps, and documents
  • Girl Scout Programs are 90 minutes long and may be reserved during Museum hours. Programs cannot be extended past 90 minutes. If a group arrives later than the appointed time, the program will be shorten to end at its original time.
  • Field Trips cost a flat rate of $150.00. Payment must be received to make a reservation. We accept credit cards, and checks.
  • Programs can have up to 30 scouts and must have one adult chaperone per every 10 participants.
  • Lunch facilities are not available in the Museum. Groups are encouraged to picnic in Central Park
  • Field trips can include New York Story, a dynamic 20-minute film covering 400 years of history. The film is recommended for second graders and above.
  • The completion of each program will entitle scouts to a New-York Historical Patch! Patches are available for purchase at the Museum Store. The cost per patch is $4.00.
  • Space is limited, so book today!

To book a program, please email us at group.tours@nyhistory.org or call (212) 873-3400 ext. 352

On Scout Days children will be able to participate in fun and informative activities led by museum educators. Advance registration for Scout Day is recommended.

 

Troop Girl Scout Programs | Girl Scout Independent Studies

 

Brownie (Grades 2-3)

Investigation | Senses
1. Look around
2. Listen to the world
3. Put your nose to work
4. Take a taste test
5. Touch and feel


Being a Historian: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts learn how to interpret the stories told in portraits, landscapes, and cityscapes. Scouts consider not only the subject and story of a painting but how and why it was created. By the end of the program, scouts will have learned how to “read” a painting just like a historian, and discover information about the past.

A Day at the Museum: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Daisies and Brownies)

  • Welcome to the New-York Historical Society! Girl Scouts will study paintings and objects from long ago and begin to understand the meaning of history and the purpose of a museum.

New York: Then and Now (Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts find clues about how life was different in the past through close observation of paintings and objects. Compare and contrast then and now to trace how New York became the city it is today.

Learning History with Paintings (Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Examine, describe, and imagine life in the past by looking at beautiful paintings; and learn how to interpret the stories these works of art tell.

The American Revolution in New York (Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts consider the causes, effects, and significance of the American Revolution in New York. Through close examination of artifacts, scouts will encounter what it was like to live day to day as a soldier in the Continental Army and a regular person during the American Revolution.

Life in New Amsterdam (Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts learn about the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam, from the reasons for its founding to the realities of daily life.

Slavery in New York (Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Uncover the central roles enslaved African people played in Dutch, British, and American New York.

New York and the Civil War (Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts learn about the experiences of soldiers and analyze the debates that raged in New York over slavery, states’ rights, and the rights of citizens.

Objects Tell Stories (Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts analyze historical artifacts to discover what they tell us about life long ago.

Industrialization (Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Investigate how life in New York City was transformed by the innovations of the Industrial Age.

 

Artist | Painting
1. Get inspired
2. Paint the real world
3. Paint a mood
4. Paint without brushes
5. Paint a mural


Girl Scouts will learn the fundamentals of painting, which you can use to create your own masterpieces at home!

Being a Historian: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts learn how to interpret the stories told in portraits, landscapes, and cityscapes. Scouts consider not only the subject and story of a painting but how and why it was created. By the end of the program, scouts will have learned how to “read” a painting just like a historian, and discover information about the past.

A Day at the Museum: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Daisies and Brownies)

  • Girl Scouts will explore the galleries to learn the fundamentals of a museum visit and the different jobs people have in the museum community. Scouts learn the techniques artists use to create different styles of paintings - landscapes, portraits, genre scenes – and explore an example of each.

Learning History with Paintings (Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts examine, describe, and imagine life in the past by looking at beautiful paintings; and learn how to interpret the stories these works of art tell.

 

Junior (Grades 4-5)

Creative Play | Playing the Past
1. Decide who you are
2. Create a costume
3. Experience daily life
4. Have some old-fashioned fun
5. Become your character


Playing in the Past (Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors)
October 30, 2015–February 28, 2016

  • This winter, the New-York Historical Society will be transformed by an enchanting exhibit of model trains and toys from the Jerni Collection. Girl Scouts will learn about the lives of children long ago and the history of toys and play through a hands-on, inquiry-based exploration of this exciting exhibition. All aboard!

Being a Historian: An Introduction to the New-York Historical Society (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts learn to think and work like historians in order to draw conclusions about the past.

New York: Then and Now (Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Explore the evolution of our city, comparing and contrasting daily life across the centuries.

Learning History with Paintings (Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts learn how to interpret the stories told in portraits, landscapes, and cityscapes.

The American Revolution in New York (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Consider the causes, effects, and significance of the American Revolution in New York by experiencing what life as a historic figure or as a regular person in the past.

Life in New Amsterdam (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts learn about the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam, from the reasons for its founding to the realities of daily life.

Slavery in New York (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts uncover the central roles enslaved African people played in Dutch, British, and American New York.

New York and the Civil War (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Learn about the experiences of soldiers and analyze the debates that raged in New York over slavery, states’ rights, and the rights of citizens.

Objects Tell Stories (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Analyze historical artifacts to discover what they tell us about life long ago.

Industrialization (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts investigate how life in New York City was transformed by the innovations of the Industrial Age.

 

Entertainment Technology
1. Animate your own artwork
2. Dig into video game development
3. Try the science of amusement park rides
4. Create your own special effects
5. Surf a sound wave


Special Exhibition Program | Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York
(November 13, 2015–April 17, 2016) (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts will engage in a Guided Tour of Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York. Using images, artifacts, interactives, and oral histories, the exhibition will look back at local innovations that were key to computer development, from vacuum tubes and punched cards to transistors. And it will highlight pioneering work after the 1964 Fair, such as the computer graphics revolution born in New York City a decade later. Long before Silicon Valley became synonymous with all things digital, New York was a key hub for imagining, developing, and selling the technology that ultimately reshaped entertainment, commerce, and daily life.
  • Girl Scouts will then participate in an introductory coding workshop in an N-YHS computer lab. Coding is what makes it possible for programmers to create computer software, apps and websites. Based on experience and skill level, scouts will be able to move at their own pace through the workshop.

 

Cadette (Grades 6-9)

Citizen | Find Common Ground
1. Get to know someone different from you
2. Make decisions in a group
3. Explore civil debate
4. Understand a compromise
5. Find common ground through mediation


Industrialization (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts will have the opportunity to explore Industrialization in New York and how individual inventions changed the lives of working New Yorkers. Scouts will compare and contrast life pre- and post-Industrialization, determining for themselves whether the revolution was a positive or negative for the people of New York.

 

Senior (Grades 9-10)

Innovation | Social Innovator
1. Explore the big picture
2. Make connections
3. Build empathy for people affected by your issue
4. Develop a solution from a specific point of view
5. Practice pitching ideas and getting feedback


Industrialization (Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors)

  • Girl Scouts will look at two historic paintings that portray the immense gap that existed between rich and poor in New York in the mid 1880’s. Specifically, the prevalence of unsupervised children living on the streets. Or, in another extreme, children working full-time in factories or sweatshops to support their families.
  • In addition, Scouts will have the opportunity to summarize how the rise of manufacturing transformed the lives of the people of New York and record their thoughts on a Museum Web Worksheet.  As a component of the program, participants will explore the emergence of the canning industry and the health benefits it provided to New Yorkers.
Creative: Tronvig Group